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Bridging the gap between business and research can be a tricky endeavour, often one tackled best by those experienced in both fields. In late 2007, Australia’s Innovation Minister, Senator Kim Carr, knew this also, relying on his senior advisor to guide him. His advisor, Tim Murphy, was precisely this. He brought with him specialised knowledge and skills in both business and science, the cumulation of an expansive career. Little did we know then, that Tim would be joining us here at ARMI as a member of the Leadership Advisory Board (ARMILAB)

It’s a bittersweet time here at ARMI. Hozana Castillo, a postdoctoral researcher with the Kaslin Group, will be heading home to Brazil after two invigorating years with us. Although sad to see her go, we are excited to see her expand her career and move on to new challenges. Joining ARMI in 2016, Hozana has since made Australia her second home, growing strong bonds with fellow members of the Kaslin Group, ARMI and Melbourne.

Life of the female scientist will inevitably incur more career disruptions than their male counterparts. For Mirana, her disruption is a tug of war -albeit a good one- between her two loves; science and motherhood. Heading off for six months maternity leave in April, it’s a frantic time for Mirana at ARMI. Juggling the life of group leader, new mother, a soon to be mother of a second child, lab deadlines, impending maternity leave and (to top it off) a burst pipe at home, Mirana’s got her work cut out for her.

A new publication in Nature Communications from the Merson group at ARMI has further defined the relationship between neuronal activity and the process of myelination, a critical step in the development of the central nervous system and in the maintenance of healthy brain function.

A discovery from the Currie Group at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI), recently published in the high-impact journal Cell Reports, has shown a crucial role for TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) in the formation of skeletal muscle and the hereditary neuromuscular disorder, nemaline myopathy. This work, led by Senior Research Fellow Dr Joachim Berger, provides novel insights into the genetic and molecular intricacies of muscle development.

A discovery led by Australian scientists at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute at Monash University published today, confirms the importance of the transient visual pathway in supporting the reach and grasp response commonly seen in newborn primates within the first few hours or days after birth.

In a first-time discovery (shocking doctors and researchers alike) a young Australian boy has retained his vision despite missing the visual cortex of his brain. Due to a rare metabolic disorder, the seven year old boy - referred to as ‘BI’ - showed no flaws in his vision other than that of nearsightedness. Following the initial discovery and an MRI scan, the Bourne Group at ARMI found an area of the boy's brain compensating for the lack of vision, leading to the hypothesis that the brain had adapted to the lack of visual cortex. This discovery and subsequent research was published recently in “Neuropsychologia