News / 5 December 2019

Artists impression of the Victorian Heart Hospital reception

Artist's impression showing internal view of the Victorian Heart Hospital. Credit: VHHSBA

The year 2022 will be a landmark year for the Monash University Clayton campus as it is the year the Victorian Heart Hospital, Australia's first hospital to be dedicated to cardiac care, is due to be completed.

The project, funded by the Victorian Government in partnership with Monash University and Monash Health, will consolidate and enhance Victoria's position in cardiac research and education while improving the quality of treatment care and health outcomes for patients.

Currently, under construction, the state-of-the-art hospital will become an epicentre for managing, treating and finding new preventative measures for one of Australia's significant causes of death. The hospital will have a full range of ambulatory and inpatient cardiac care, providing a depth and breadth of education options for undergraduate and postgraduate medical, nursing and science students.

For ARMI, the Victorian Heart Hospital also offers an unprecedented opportunity to deepen clinical linkages and catalyse the development of potential new treatments for patients.

"With heart and muscle development and regeneration being a key area of research for ARMI scientists, a closer proximity to expert clinicians, specialised facilities and greater access to patients will change, for the better, the way we do research and the way we think about translating our discoveries from the bench to the clinic," commented Professor Pete Currie, ARMI's Director of Research.

Stem cell and regenerative medicine research holds great promise in better understanding and delivering novel therapies for a range of heart diseases and disorders- from congenital heart disease to tissue regeneration following heart attacks. With these lines of inquiry fast-evolving, having a strong synergistic relationship with a specialised cardiac hospital and access to a specific patient cohort will only act to accelerate sample and data collection, clinical trials, and in the future, therapy delivery.

"It's exciting to be amongst this leading initiative in Australia," said Professor Currie. "Creating this new, integrated interface for scientists, clinicians and health professionals, and patients make for a stronger medical ecosystem that reduces risk, maximises efficiency and optimises treatment efficacy."

Not only that, but having the Victorian Heart Hospital so close to ARMI on the Monash University Clayton campus will help remind scientists of the people they're trying to help. "Sometimes, when you're working on one piece of a complex jigsaw puzzle for so long, it can be easy to lose the big picture. Having frequent contact with doctors and with patients will give the often abstract concept of helping people a present and tangible form, it will add another dimension to what motivates us," added Professor Currie.

While it may be a few years yet, we eagerly anticipate the completion and opening of the Victorian Heart Hospital and the exciting possibilities for collaboration it will bring to improve the lives of patients.